Goheenroots

Notes


Matches 12,501 to 12,550 of 13,143

      «Prev «1 ... 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 ... 263» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
12501 Warren E Goheen, 68, of 714 N Ninth St., died Sunday afternoon at 12:40 in St Joseph Hospital, where he had been a patient since Tuesday.
Also known as "Whitey." he was the husband of Esther M. (Ruth) Goheen.
Born in Seyferts Station, he was a son of ary E (Killian) Goheen, of Reading, and the ate Leon V Goheen.
He was employed as a truck driver and clerk by the former Goheen Moving Service and the former Orth Auction House for 33 years. His last employment, before retiring in 1980, was with the Fritz Moving co.
He was member of St. Stephen's United Church of Christ.
Having served in the Army during World War II, Goheen was a past senior vice commander of Haag Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars.
He was former trustee of the Northeast Democratic Association.
In addition to his wife and his mother, he is survived by two daughters, Doris M., wife of Gary W DeWees, Warnersville, and Sharon L Goheen, Reading; and two sons, William H., Melbourne, Fla., and Gary L., Reading.
Also seven grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and a sister, Betty J., wife of Warren G Rea, Talatka, Fla.
Dean Funeral Home Inc., Reading, is in charge of arrangements 
Goheen, Warren E (I54)
 
12502 WARREN G. REAM
Warrren G. Ream, age 87 of Palatka, passed away Friday, June 3, 2011 at Palatka Health Care Center following an extended illness. He was a native of Reading, PA and resided in Putnam County since 1956 coming from Reading. Mr. Ream was a U.S. Army Veteran of WWII, where he was a Purple Heart recipient. He had retired from Palatka Natural Gas, where he had worked for 10 years. He had also worked as a body repairman at St. Johns Chevrolet for 20 years. He was a member of VFW Post # 3349. He enjoyed woodworking and especially making clocks and cabinets, as well as traveling and camping and in the past had been a model railroader.
He is survived by his wife of 69 years, Betty Ream of Palatka, 2 sons, Leon Ream and wife, Brenda of Providence and Jesse Ream and wife, DeRonda of Gainesville, a brother, Eugene Ream and wife, Marguerite of Anchorage, AK, 5 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.
No services are scheduled at this time. In lieu of flowers the family requests that memorial donations be made to St. John Lutheran Church, 1262 S. Hwy 19, Palatka, FL, 32177 or to the charity of your choice. 
Ream, Warren George (I5485)
 
12503 Warren is 7 years old in 1860 Bailey, Warren R (I1117)
 
12504 Warren Wolf, ages 30, of 316 Beech avenue, sustained a fracture of the middle and first fingers of the left hand following his being struck by a sledge hammer in Juniata blacksmith shop Wolfe, Warren Bucher (I6951)
 
12505 Warrents were issued yesterday by Mayor Jones for the arrest of the following names persons of Bourbon for the unlawfull selling of intoxicating liquor in the city limits ... John Goheen... They were brought before before the mayor who set trial for Tuesday and Wednesday and the men were given their freedom by giving bond of $100 each. Goheen, John Sterling (I4492)
 
12506 Warwick township Association 1775,
Roll of Captain Peter Grubbs, Jr. Company of Miles. Edward Goheen private.
The entry for the 10th Battalion;
Second Company - Captain James Davies, 7th class - Edward Goheen
The rife regiment and musketry battalion rendezvoused at Marcus Hook. On the 2d of July Miles regiment was ordered up to Philadelphia. Col. Miles was ordered over to New York on the 10th of August. In the battle of Long Island, August 27th Miles regiment and Atlee's battalion suffered so severely that Gen. Washington ordered the three battalions to be considered as a regiment, under the command of Lieut.Col Brodhead, until further orders. On Thursday, September 19th, "the three battalions mutinied and appeared on the parade under arms. After this they deserted in parties with their arms, about two hundred men in the whole" A party of about thirty of them, attempting to desert, was kept back by force,and during the affair a corporal of the the mutineers attempted to bayonet a lieutenant and shoot an ensign, Those who deserted gave as a reason for doing so, a lack of clothing, blankets, rations, and pay, notwithstanding that al had been paid to the 1st of August, "and some deserted immediately after having their full pay to the 1st of September." The following petition or statement of alleged grievances, signed by fifty-eight "privates in Col. Miles' and Atlee's battalions, returned from cam without leave," and addressed and presented to the Committee of Safety: 
Goheen, Edward (I1959)
 
12507 was a charter member of Rebekah Lodge 166 and a charter member of the Women's Auzuliary of the Boalsburg Fire Company. She was also a life member of the Academy of Friendship, Women of the Moose, Bellefonte. Myers, Naomi Ruth (I285)
 
12508 Was a delegate to the 2nd contental congress, 1776. He was born and died in Chester County PA. Lintage: John Jacobs m. 1753 Elizabeth Havard B. 1720. Benjamin Jacobs (1754-1807) m. Elizabeth Potts. John Jacobs m. Catherine Sheetz. Amer Gleason 1805-87 m. 1829 Caroline Jacobs 1813-79. Jacobs, John (I554)
 
12509 Was home on Christmas vacation when become ill and died. Dr. J. S. Stakr, D. D. Pres of college gave remarks at service. Myers, John Phillip (I282)
 
12510 was killed on the night of April 21, 1676 in Sudbury Fight with King Philip's warriors, in which the brave Col. wadsworth and his men, perhaps 50 or 60 in number, were ambushed and most of them slaughtered Gleason, Nathaniel (I3251)
 
12511 Was listed as senior. propable has son by same name. McWilliams, Paul E (I1603)
 
12512 Was listed in 1890 Business Directory. Bailey, Margaret (I2019)
 
12513 Was living in Mckeesport at time of fathers death. He taught in McKeesport for 2 1/2 years. Myers, Edward Heintzleman (I270)
 
12514 Was Member of Grand Army of Republic. Bailey, Samuel H. (I1112)
 
12515 was Methodist missionary to Liberia for many years, first entered service in 1837. Widow donated money to Hamline Univerisity St Paul Minnesota in memory of dead child, with which was built "Goheen Hall"
Upon reaching Liberia, he was an important factor as a physician and Christian worker.He stood at this post of duty for five years. 
Goheen, Sylvanus McIntyre (I2174)
 
12516 Was on the tax list in Havard in 1693 Havard, David (I1020)
 
12517 Was Presbyterian Missionary residing in Sangli, India. Goheen, John Lawrence (I364)
 
12518 Was present when Memorial was dedicated by DAR to John Goheen. Campbell, James W (I1144)
 
12519 Was sole survivor of Robert G. Goheen Estate. She was then Elizabeth G. Wyse. Goheen, Elizabeth Sample (I401)
 
12520 was taxed on 10 1/2 acres of cleared land valued at $175. Also 39 acres valued at $1800. 2 horses at $175, and 2 cattle at $60. Myers, William Mulburger (I276)
 
12521 was taxed, 3 acres of mountain land value $31, House and Lot value $125, occupation carpenter; tax $.35 Weaver, Daniel (I641)
 
12522 Washburn, John W - of age
Goheen, Martha A - verbal consent of father
by Henry C. Gamble minister at Thomas L. Goheen, Marshall County, Kentucky
wit: Lee Aston, Jacob Wolf
Bk#3 mariage docket, license # 2440 
Family F1131
 
12523 Washington County:
28 December ye 1784, Washington County
Dr. Sr. plese to Let the Barer Jno. Goble have what Due bille is comin to n.e.. for my Sarvis on the Station and in so doing you'l oblidg your frend.
Ebenezer Goble 
Goble, William Ebenezer (I8773)
 
12524 Washington Goble age 37, farmer, born Indiana, personnel estate $425
Sarah A age 27 Born Illinois
Allen B age 3 born Texas
Arthur W age 9 months
Sarah age 77 born Kentucky
Henry Brown age 70 born England
Sarah Brown age 63 born Ohio 
Ferguson, Sarah (I8608)
 
12525 Washington Goble age 37, farmer, born Indiana, personnel estate $425
Sarah A age 27 Born Illinois
Allen B age 3 born Texas
Arthur W age 9 months
Sarah age 77 born Kentucky
Henry Brown age 70 born England
Sarah Brown age 63 born Ohio 
Goble, Alice Belle (I8628)
 
12526 Washington Goble age 37, farmer, born Indiana, personnel estate $425
Sarah A age 27 Born Illinois
Allise B age 3 female born Texas
Arthur W age 9 months, born Texas
Sarah age 77 born Kentucky
Henry Brown age 70 born England
Sarah Brown age 63 born Ohio 
Goble, Washington C (I8627)
 
12527 Washington Heintzleman age 24 Railroad fireman, born Pennsylvania
Louis age 24 born Illinois
Fannie M age 3 born Illinois
Charles age 1 born Illinois 
Heinselman, Washington (I2548)
 
12528 Water Street, Pine Grove Mills,
John H. Father, 56 years old married 25 years, truck driver, owns hose value $9000.
Ina M., mother age 53, married 25 years,
Warren R., son age 20, single not employed. 
Bailey, Warren R. (I2342)
 
12529 Water Street, Pine Grove Mills,
John H. Father, 56 years old married 25 years, truck driver, owns hose value $9000.
Ina M., mother age 53, married 25 years,
Warren R., son age 20, single not employed. 
Bailey, John Henry (I1205)
 
12530 Water Street, Pine Grove Mills, John H. Father, 56 years old married 25 years, truck driver, owns hose value $9000. Ina M., mother age 53, married 25 years, Warren R., son age 20, single not employed. Bailey, Warren R. (I2342)
 
12531 Water Street, Pine Grove Mills, John H. Father, 56 years old married 25 years, truck driver, owns hose value $9000. Ina M., mother age 53, married 25 years, Warren R., son age 20, single not employed. Bailey, Warren R. (I2342)
 
12532 Wayne Goble age 28 owns house with mortgage, born Texas, parents USA reporter for daily paper
Helen L wife age 28 born Arkansas, father Alabama mother Arkansas
Mary G daughter 4 years 6 months born California
Helen L daughter 2 years 6 months born California
Mary W Collins, mother-in-law, wiow age 60 born Alabama, father Tennessee, mother Alabama 
Goble, William Wayne (I8725)
 
12533 Wayne Goble own home $5000 has radio, age 38 married at age 22 born Texas, father Indiana mother USA, Advertiser Signe V
Helen L wife age 38 born Arkansas, parents USA
Gelene M daughter age 14 born California
Helen L daughter age 12 born California
Wayne D son age 4, born California
Betty B daughter age 2 years 10 months born CAlifornia 
Goble, William Wayne (I8725)
 
12534 Wayne Township
Samuel Goble lived just about the site of what was subequently known as Church's Mill at the time of the land sale, and had a good cabin and some eight or ten acres partially cleared and under good fence. All these improvements were bid from under him by David Lauerback, who so well undertook the estimate in which he would be held by the early settlers that he "made himself scarce" afterward. Of those who came in before or just about the time of the land sale may be mentioned Waitsel M Cary, Abraham Heaton, Samuel Cary, Jacob Parkhurst, .... 
Goble, Samuel (I8778)
 
12535 We Remember Her

Mrs. Joseph M. Goheen passed away on June 16th last, in America. This Mission joins in sincerest sympathy with the bereaved children.
Though she left India two years ago, the benediction of her loving spirit is still with us, and those of us who knew her count ourselves the richer.
It seems fitting that this number of the WESTERN INDIA NOTES should be dedicated to Mr. and Mrs. Goheen. It is well that those of us who are of the later generation should recall the deeds and revere the virtues of these who have gone before, and pray that we may learn to follow them as they followed the Master.

Mrs. Joseph Milliken Goheen : An Appreciation

On June 16th, 1924, there passed away from earth one of the sweetest and noblest souls that ever dwelt in mortal flesh.
Amanda McGinnes came to India as a young missionary-bright, gifted and talented?in 1876. A few years later, as Mrs. J. M. Goheen, she became one of the pioneers, one of the formers and framers of public opinion in the Western India Mission.
Kolhapur needed' her. Her home was a model for Indian women to copy. Her children were just like other children, but father's word was law, and no one took liberties with Mr. Goheen.
As the children one by one had to leave the home?nest (and in those clays it was at far too early an age) Mrs. Goheen took to her heart all the young people of the Mission, and in mothering them was comforted for her very own, who were far away.
The Goheen home was one of whole?hearted hospitality. Any guest who came went away richer and happier for the brief sojourn with these choice spirits. From the first minute to the last, you felt you were cared for. Nil?. Goheen personally insist meet every guest at tile station (after tile railroad lead pushed oil from Poona, and Kolhapur boasted a station of its own), and each departing visitor? was sped on his way having learned, if he did not know it before, that " Prayer and provender hinder no man's journey." The Lord's Day was a day kept. sacred to God, and to service for humanity.
Mrs. Goheen gathered tile nucleus of tile present " Esther Patton " School in Kolhapur; she acted as its Principal for a time; she encouraged girls' schools in the city, often visited tile Palace Schools, and was deeply interested in all educational work. When she saw the lamentable condition of young widows in India, she longed to gather them where they could lie protected while earning their support, and also be taught, to be living stones in the temple of tile Lord. Through a friend iii India, named Alice, and a favorite sister of her own by ? that name, together with gifts from friends at home she was able to build a small hostel, where childless widows and motherless bairns found love and cheer rind food anal clothing. Mending and making, patching rind teaching, all went on in " Alice Home.'' The little orphans ran with open arms to the gentle "Mother," who played games with them, sang with them, and took them, when naughty, into the " little room " to Help them to be good.
This friend of all was never too busy to receive calls from the ladies of the Maharaja's family, or to call upon them. Her presence was solicited in times .of joy or sorrow. When the son of the late Maharaja was dying, it was she who held the hand of the Queen?Mother, and gave her sympathy in full measure to her and to the young widow of sixteen years.
Mrs. Goheen's Scotch forebears had endowed her with a monumental faith, while her French and Irish ancestors were responsible for her vivacity, finesse and ready wit. Her eyes could twinkle with merriment or fill with quick tears, as she shared the joy or grief of her friends. These charming gifts made her a delightful companion and sweetened every situation. If a conversation at table began to get on the shoals, or showed signs of personality, she would get us all laughing by saying, " Now, let's talk of Mahabelshwar potatoes," and the situation was saved. Poetry she loved, and repeated choice bits with us who shared her tastes. One of her sons has the same flair, as his lines to his mother prove.
The reply of one who was asked to name her chief characteristic was, " Oh! the unbounded love she had for everyone in the world She believed in a second chance for the boy who had failed to make good, and she was ready to lift up and carry in the arms of her buoyant faith those who lead lost theirs. She seemed to have been given God's gift of helpfulness, so that wherever she went, a flower of joy or courage bloomed where she had passed. She loved flowers as she loved children, and they always flourished for her. The gardeners in the public gardens were all her friends, and delighted to receive hints on flower?culture from her or to show her a new plant.
Only once in all her Indian life did " Mother " Goheen get her own consent to make a journey of any distance outside her Mission. She and Father Goheen went to General Assembly at Allahabad. It has been often told how Mother Goheen's judicious and tactful way of describing the work of women, who were all voters in our Mission, decided the North India missionaries to give the vote to the women of their Mission.
One supreme characteristic was Mrs. Goheen's never?failing patience. Someone wrote of her: "I was impressed, again and again, with the response this beautiful spirit of hers received, not only from the women in Alice Home, but from all with whom she worked. One day she and I were walking along a street in Panhala, and a Marathi woman came out of her house, and threw her arms around Mrs. Goheen saying, ' You are our mother.' That same summer, as we would go for walks and come back at dusk, from all over the hill would come voices calling, ` Goodnight, Mother.' I remember one clay, when site was visiting in Sangli, the Indian preacher said to her, ' I wish you could come with me to our villages. If our people could just see your face they would be Blessed.'
" What precious memories come to each cue of [is as we think of her unnumbered kindnesses to those of us who knew her. One Mississippi girl fondly remembers her wedding clay, just after her arrival in the Mission, when lather Goheen gave her away and Mother Goheen did all that an own mother could have done for a loved daughter to make the day perfect for her."

Mr. Goheen had the charge of a large and needy village district. Those villagers as they came to him for advice, and for spiritual and material help, were all as children to Mother Goheen. She knew the name and age of each child and the needs of each mother. They were blessed, indeed, who shared the largesse of her love.
Father Goheen was known as "The soul of punctuality," always on time, never forgot an engagement. If Goheen Sheb said he would be at a village at nine in the morning, he was there at nine, not eleven, or ten. He was a generous giver, not only of alms but of himself. One Indian pastor received front hint a good, long ministerial coat. To wear it on great occasions was Saheb pride and joy, and he said to the writer one day, " Goheen Saheb not only gave it me, but he put it on me himself, and patted my shoulders with his own loving hands." The graciousness of the giving enriched the gift, and warmed the heart of the man of God.
After Miss Ellen Parsons lead visited in their home, she wrote, " It is a beautiful thing to have created in Kolhapur such an atmosphere as Mr. raid Mrs. Goheen have created."
Mr. Goheen literally gave his life for India. Worn and jaded, in looks older than his own father, he returned to the States after the stress of the famine that lead sapped his strength, and he died in 1907.
Mrs. Goheen remained at home with her unmarried children till 1913, when she returned to he again the " Mother " of the Mission and to complete her long term of service, almost forty years on the field.
In 1922, when the Mission approved tire request of Mrs. Goheen to be permitted to retire in America, the following resolution was adopted: "The members of the Western India Mission wish to express their appreciation of the long years of unstinted service rendered by Mrs. J. Milliken Goheen Her presence among us was always as the sweet fragrance of a favourite flower. Although for the greater part of her life she was a member of Kolhapur Station, her interest was Mission?wide. 'A sympathetic 'Mother' to missionaries and Indians alike, a gracious hostess, and a wise counsellor, of her it might be said that she opened her mouth with wisdom, and in her tongue was the law of kindness."
Her death occurred in Pittsburgh and she was laid to rest in her loved Huntingdon County, in the Cemetery of the Graysville Church, Spruce Creek Valley, Pennsylvania, beside her husband.
"Her children arise up mid call her blessed 
Goheen, Joseph Milliken (I355)
 
12536 We Remember Her

Mrs. Joseph M. Goheen passed away on June 16th last, in America. This Mission joins in sincerest sympathy with the bereaved children.
Though she left India two years ago, the benediction of her loving spirit is still with us, and those of us who knew her count ourselves the richer.
It seems fitting that this number of the WESTERN INDIA NOTES should be dedicated to Mr. and Mrs. Goheen. It is well that those of us who are of the later generation should recall the deeds and revere the virtues of these who have gone before, and pray that we may learn to follow them as they followed the Master.

Mrs. Joseph Milliken Goheen : An Appreciation

On June 16th, 1924, there passed away from earth one of the sweetest and noblest souls that ever dwelt in mortal flesh.
Amanda McGinnes came to India as a young missionary-bright, gifted and talented?in 1876. A few years later, as Mrs. J. M. Goheen, she became one of the pioneers, one of the formers and framers of public opinion in the Western India Mission.
Kolhapur needed' her. Her home was a model for Indian women to copy. Her children were just like other children, but father's word was law, and no one took liberties with Mr. Goheen.
As the children one by one had to leave the home?nest (and in those clays it was at far too early an age) Mrs. Goheen took to her heart all the young people of the Mission, and in mothering them was comforted for her very own, who were far away.
The Goheen home was one of whole?hearted hospitality. Any guest who came went away richer and happier for the brief sojourn with these choice spirits. From the first minute to the last, you felt you were cared for. Nil?. Goheen personally insist meet every guest at tile station (after tile railroad lead pushed oil from Poona, and Kolhapur boasted a station of its own), and each departing visitor? was sped on his way having learned, if he did not know it before, that " Prayer and provender hinder no man's journey." The Lord's Day was a day kept. sacred to God, and to service for humanity.
Mrs. Goheen gathered tile nucleus of tile present " Esther Patton " School in Kolhapur; she acted as its Principal for a time; she encouraged girls' schools in the city, often visited tile Palace Schools, and was deeply interested in all educational work. When she saw the lamentable condition of young widows in India, she longed to gather them where they could lie protected while earning their support, and also be taught, to be living stones in the temple of tile Lord. Through a friend iii India, named Alice, and a favorite sister of her own by ? that name, together with gifts from friends at home she was able to build a small hostel, where childless widows and motherless bairns found love and cheer rind food anal clothing. Mending and making, patching rind teaching, all went on in " Alice Home.'' The little orphans ran with open arms to the gentle "Mother," who played games with them, sang with them, and took them, when naughty, into the " little room " to Help them to be good.
This friend of all was never too busy to receive calls from the ladies of the Maharaja's family, or to call upon them. Her presence was solicited in times .of joy or sorrow. When the son of the late Maharaja was dying, it was she who held the hand of the Queen?Mother, and gave her sympathy in full measure to her and to the young widow of sixteen years.
Mrs. Goheen's Scotch forebears had endowed her with a monumental faith, while her French and Irish ancestors were responsible for her vivacity, finesse and ready wit. Her eyes could twinkle with merriment or fill with quick tears, as she shared the joy or grief of her friends. These charming gifts made her a delightful companion and sweetened every situation. If a conversation at table began to get on the shoals, or showed signs of personality, she would get us all laughing by saying, " Now, let's talk of Mahabelshwar potatoes," and the situation was saved. Poetry she loved, and repeated choice bits with us who shared her tastes. One of her sons has the same flair, as his lines to his mother prove.
The reply of one who was asked to name her chief characteristic was, " Oh! the unbounded love she had for everyone in the world She believed in a second chance for the boy who had failed to make good, and she was ready to lift up and carry in the arms of her buoyant faith those who lead lost theirs. She seemed to have been given God's gift of helpfulness, so that wherever she went, a flower of joy or courage bloomed where she had passed. She loved flowers as she loved children, and they always flourished for her. The gardeners in the public gardens were all her friends, and delighted to receive hints on flower?culture from her or to show her a new plant.
Only once in all her Indian life did " Mother " Goheen get her own consent to make a journey of any distance outside her Mission. She and Father Goheen went to General Assembly at Allahabad. It has been often told how Mother Goheen's judicious and tactful way of describing the work of women, who were all voters in our Mission, decided the North India missionaries to give the vote to the women of their Mission.
One supreme characteristic was Mrs. Goheen's never?failing patience. Someone wrote of her: "I was impressed, again and again, with the response this beautiful spirit of hers received, not only from the women in Alice Home, but from all with whom she worked. One day she and I were walking along a street in Panhala, and a Marathi woman came out of her house, and threw her arms around Mrs. Goheen saying, ' You are our mother.' That same summer, as we would go for walks and come back at dusk, from all over the hill would come voices calling, ` Goodnight, Mother.' I remember one clay, when site was visiting in Sangli, the Indian preacher said to her, ' I wish you could come with me to our villages. If our people could just see your face they would be Blessed.'
" What precious memories come to each cue of [is as we think of her unnumbered kindnesses to those of us who knew her. One Mississippi girl fondly remembers her wedding clay, just after her arrival in the Mission, when lather Goheen gave her away and Mother Goheen did all that an own mother could have done for a loved daughter to make the day perfect for her."

Mr. Goheen had the charge of a large and needy village district. Those villagers as they came to him for advice, and for spiritual and material help, were all as children to Mother Goheen. She knew the name and age of each child and the needs of each mother. They were blessed, indeed, who shared the largesse of her love.
Father Goheen was known as "The soul of punctuality," always on time, never forgot an engagement. If Goheen Sheb said he would be at a village at nine in the morning, he was there at nine, not eleven, or ten. He was a generous giver, not only of alms but of himself. One Indian pastor received front hint a good, long ministerial coat. To wear it on great occasions was Saheb pride and joy, and he said to the writer one day, " Goheen Saheb not only gave it me, but he put it on me himself, and patted my shoulders with his own loving hands." The graciousness of the giving enriched the gift, and warmed the heart of the man of God.
After Miss Ellen Parsons lead visited in their home, she wrote, " It is a beautiful thing to have created in Kolhapur such an atmosphere as Mr. raid Mrs. Goheen have created."
Mr. Goheen literally gave his life for India. Worn and jaded, in looks older than his own father, he returned to the States after the stress of the famine that lead sapped his strength, and he died in 1907.
Mrs. Goheen remained at home with her unmarried children till 1913, when she returned to he again the " Mother " of the Mission and to complete her long term of service, almost forty years on the field.
In 1922, when the Mission approved tire request of Mrs. Goheen to be permitted to retire in America, the following resolution was adopted: "The members of the Western India Mission wish to express their appreciation of the long years of unstinted service rendered by Mrs. J. Milliken Goheen Her presence among us was always as the sweet fragrance of a favourite flower. Although for the greater part of her life she was a member of Kolhapur Station, her interest was Mission?wide. 'A sympathetic 'Mother' to missionaries and Indians alike, a gracious hostess, and a wise counsellor, of her it might be said that she opened her mouth with wisdom, and in her tongue was the law of kindness."
Her death occurred in Pittsburgh and she was laid to rest in her loved Huntingdon County, in the Cemetery of the Graysville Church, Spruce Creek Valley, Pennsylvania, beside her husband.
"Her children arise up mid call her blessed 
McGinnes, Amanda Blais (I362)
 
12537 Weaver, Widow of Daniel, House and Lot, cow; poor children 11 yr Eve Weaver, 6 yr Jacob Weaver; Elizabeth Weaver Wd. Keplinger, Elizabeth (I1109)
 
12538 Weaver, Widow of Daniel, House and Lot, cow; poor children 11 yr Eve Weaver, 6 yr Jacob Weaver; Elizabeth Weaver Wd. Weaver, Eve (I2475)
 
12539 Wesley Cave age 56, shoemaker born Virginia
Martha age 42, born Virginia
Aliace, age 18 born Virginia
Belfield, age 8, farm hand born Virginia 
Cave, Wesley (I9326)
 
12540 Wesley is a Laborer age 28, Elizabeth is 26 years old, John P. age 7 the oldest son, Edward age 4. Heintzleman, Catherine Elizabeth (I275)
 
12541 Wesley Myers born October 1851, married 28 years, born in Pennsylvania and parents born in Pennsylvania. He is a butcher and owns a farm free of mortgage. Catharine, his wife, born December 1854, has had 2 children and one is alive. Catharine and her parents were born on Pennsylvania. Edward H., their son, born January 1876, single and born in Pennsylvania. Edward is a teacher. Myers, Joseph Wesley (I274)
 
12542 Wesley Myers was born October 1851, and had been married 28 years. He is a butcher and owns a farm free of mortgage. Catharine, his wife, was born December 1854 and has had 2 children and one is alive. Edward H. son, born January 1876 is single and born in Pennsylvania. Edward is a teacher. Heintzleman, Catherine Elizabeth (I275)
 
12543 Wesley purchased land for $525 in the Village of State College. Beginning at a point South Twenty-one degrees East 21 feet 10 inches from corner between the lots of William Frear, Miss Elizabeth D. Price and Allen St. thence along said street S 51.5 degrees E 208 ft to Allen st. thence along said street S 51.5 degrees E 50 ft to lot of D.W. Myers. thence along lot of said Myers S 51.5 degrees W 207 1/2 ft. to alley. thence along alley N 50 degrees W 50 ft to beginning. Containing 50 ft front on Allen street. Myers, Joseph Wesley (I274)
 
12544 west wing Court House Clark, Timothy Goodwin C (I570)
 
12545 when as a fifty five year old farmer, he enlisted as a private in the Home Guard of Clarke County Reserves/ State Militia Cave, John Brown (I8548)
 
12546 When enlisted he was 21 9/12 years of age and by occupation a Switchman. He had blue eyes, Brown hair, Ruddy complexion and was 5 feet 6 1/2 inches in height. Ray qualified as sharpshooter on 8/13/18 and was in no battles. He served as clerk, chauffeur and mechanic. He was not married. He relinested when he was 23 7/12 years old, and discharged on 28 April 1920, as Sergeant first class. Albright, Ray Winfield (I215)
 
12547 When father died the children of James received 1/3 of estate Goheen, James (I1819)
 
12548 When father died the children of Richard received 1/3 of estate Goheen, Richard (I1820)
 
12549 When his father died and he was the administrator of the the estate, Application for Letters of Administration on the Estate of Mrs. Katherine E. Myers, late of Harris Township.
Before the Register of Centre County personally appeared Edward H Myers, who being sworn says that Katherine E Myers, who at that time a resident of Harris Twp. Centre County, died intestate on January 14th A.D. 1918 at 11: P.M. possessed a personal estate to the value of $1000 and real estate of none...signed by, Edward H. Myers age 42, son residence Newark, New Jersey. 
Myers, Edward Heintzleman (I270)
 
12550 When Thomas Goheen Sr, died in 1838 he was buried in the first plot of what is now St. Mark's Church Cemetery. His wife, Rebecca Clark, son Thomas Jr. and his wife Levina were later buried there as well. The grave was marked only by a large field stone until August 8, 1965 when many members of the Goheen Family gathered at St. Marks's to witness the dedication of the bronze plaque placed on the stone by a committee comprised of Raymond and Noray Goheen.

In his will dated Feb 25, 1850, Thomas Sr. left his son, Samuel, ..."all that parcel or Tract of land situated in the Township of Hamilton in the County of Northumberland in the District of Newcastle and Province of Upper Canada, being the east half of the south hundred acres of Lot No. 35 in the second Concession of the said Township of Hamilton." To his son Jesse, Thomas Sr. left the west half of the same south hundred acres. The will was witnessed by Joseph Hagerman, John Finnie and William Lang. 
Goheen, Thomas (I1668)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 ... 263» Next»